Is Stress Shutting Down Your Sex Drive?

One of the most frequent complaints that I hear from women in my office is that they have no sex drive. Like zero. Nada. Nothing. It’s as if that part of their brain has turned off and doesn’t seem to want to turn back on anytime soon.

There are many reasons why women experience a low sex drive including side effects from birth control pills, low estrogen and low testosterone. But, in my experience, the number one cause of low libido is STRESS.

The reality is that our sex drive is turned down as a PROTECTIVE MECHANISM. What you need to understand is that stress shuts down our sex drive for good reason.

When the body is under stress, it activates the sympathetic nervous system which is also known as our “fight or flight” response. When this response is activated, our body engages in a variety of activities that help us to survive and cope with that stress. We send lots of blood to our brain (so we can respond quickly and appropriately) and lungs and muscles (so we can run away). We may not be fighting off saber tooth tigers anymore but our body still responds in the same way. And let’s face it ladies, between family, work, and social obligations, we’re under low-grade stress all the time.

Another side-effect of this stress response is a reduction of blood flow to your reproductive organs and putting a major damper on your sex drive. WHY? The last thing your body needs when it’s under stress is another human being to take care off (aka a baby). You see, when you are under stress, your body shuts down your sex drive to limit the chances you’ll become pregnant in an effort to try to help you.

Even if you’re post-menopausal or on birth control and technically can’t get pregnant, your body will still shut down your libido because it doesn’t know any better. It’s a automatic response that is hard wired into us that actually helped keep our ancestors alive.

So, if you want that part of your brain to wake up and re-activate, you need to practice getting out of that sympathetic “fight or flight” response and start hanging out in a more relaxed parasympathetic “rest and digest” state. This is when the body is relaxed, feels safe and can start to warm that fire in your loins. (PS. men also need to be in this state to achieve and maintain an erection).

My best strategies for tapping into “rest and digest”:

  • Get at least 7 hours of sleep every night (this is the ultimate relaxed state)
  • Take 10 deep abdominal breaths before each meal
  • Learn to say “no” (and not feel guilty about it!)
  • Start a daily meditation practice such as the HeadSpace App (and come try our new service: MUSE Biofeedback Meditation)
  • Cultivate mindfulness (try to enjoy the present moment.) Start with simple activities such as mindfully brushing your teeth. Keep your mind focused by paying attention to the smell and taste of your toothpaste, the feeling of the brush against your teeth, the sounds it’s making. It’s simple but it works!

Wondering if stress is really affecting your sex drive and overall health?

Get your stress hormone levels test with our Adrenal Function Panel. It’s a simple at home saliva test that maps out your cortisol and DHEAS. You can learn more about it here. Test Cost = $220.

When it comes to your period, what’s normal?

I don’t know about you, but my girlfriends and I never really got into the nitty gritty details of our periods. Most of us don’t talk about how often we’re changing our tampon or how many clots we pass, which leaves many of us assuming that what we experience every month must be normal. But just because cramping and PMS are common, it doesn’t mean that they’re normal and you have to live with them. Periods don’t have to cramp your style (pun intended!) And while there is definitely some variation from woman to woman, here’s what’s “normal” when it comes to your period.

1. Your cycle length (aka how often you’re getting your period)

  • NORMAL: 21-35 days (most women assume their cycle is 28 days which is the standard cycle when you take the birth control pill but most women’s cycle isn’t exactly 28 days).
  • NOT NORMAL:
    • Less than 21 days: could be a sign of a cycle without ovulation, short follicular phase (aka time between your period starting and ovulation), progesterone deficiency, perimenopase, or stress.
    • More than 35 days: cycle without ovulation, long follicular phase, stress, recent illness, thyroid disease, PCOS (aka polycystic ovarian syndrome), high prolactin (hormone involved in milk production).

time-calendar-saturday-weekend-60032

 2. Your flow length (aka how long you bleed)

  • NORMAL: Most women bleed for 3-5 days (with days 1 and 2 being heaviest), including a day or two of light spotting as it finishes up.
  • NOT NORMAL:
    • Less than 3 days: can be a sign of estrogen deficiency (especially if flow is very light and pale pink).
    • More than 7 days: can a sign of high estrogen, endometriosis or fibroids.

 3. How much you bleed

  • NORMAL: You should lose about 50 mL of blood.
    • One soaked regular pad or tampon = 5 mL
    • One super tampon = 10 mL
    • 50 mL = 10 fully soaked regular tampons or 5 fully soaked super tampons over the span of your period
  •  NOT NORMAL:
    • Light period (aka less than 25 mL): can be a sign of PCOS, high stress, estrogen deficiency, or thyroid disease.
    • Heavy period (aka more than 80 mL):  can be a sign of a cycle without ovulation, excess estrogen, low progesterone, estrogen dominance, PCOS, thyroid disease, fibroids, endometriosis.

 4. What your blood looks like

  • NORMAL: menstrual fluid should be liquid, with no large clots. Your menstrual fluid should a reddish-brown colour.
  • NOT NORMAL:
    • Brown blood: is typically a sign of old blood that wasn’t shed during your last period
    • Large clots (bigger than the end of your thumb): can be a sign of high estrogen or estrogen dominance, endometriosis, or fibroids.

 5. PMS & Cramping

  • NORMAL: its common to feel a little congestion or cramping in your lowpexels-photo-735966er belly before your period, and to experience mild mood changes, fatigue and a desire to stay in and binge-watch Netflix.
  • NOT NORMAL: being a sugar-crazed carb monster, having swollen super-sensitive breasts, needing to wear a bigger pant size and flying off the handle at the slightest annoyance. PMS is often a sign of either high estrogen, low progesterone or both. Menstrual cramps that cause you to miss work or need pharmaceutical pain relief can be a sign of magnesium
    deficiency, inflammation, hormone imbalance, endometriosis or fibroids.

 6. Spotting

  • NORMAL: its normal to have light spotting on the day of ovulation (more common with low estrogen).
  • NOT NORMAL: Light bleeding before your periodcould be a sign of progesterone deficiency.

If you experience several symptoms that are “not normal” every month, check in with your family doctor or  naturopathic doctor to see if you might have a hormonal imbalance that requires some attention.

Book your FREE 15-minute Meet & Greet consultation with Dr. Sarah
to get started on getting back to a healthy, happy, feel-good life.

 

Vitamin D Deficiency: the missing key to your optimal health?

Vitamin D is best known for its role in forming strong, healthy bones, however, it also plays a critical role in the following areas:

  • Immune system
  • Hormone balance
  • Muscle function
  • Cardiovascular function
  • Respiratory function
  • Brain development
  • Anti-cancer effects

What are the best ways to get vitamin D?

Commonly known as “the sunshine vitamin,” the skin is able to make vitamin D when it is exposed to sunlight. There are also small amounts of vitamin D in foods such as fortified milk, and yogurt, cheese, eggs, cod liver oil, beef liver, and fatty fish such as salmon, trout, and tuna. However, it is very difficult to meet you requirements through diet alone.

How much vitamin D do I need?

The Recommended Dietary Allowance (RDA) for adults is 600 international units (IU) for adults, and 800 IU for seniors over the age of 70. These are the bare minimum amounts you need to prevent rickets but they are FAR from enough for most adults to optimize vitamin D levels to get all of its benefits (including anti-cancer effects).

According to the Vitamin D Council (and based on my clinical experience), most adults require 4000 IU or more during the winter months depending on their blood levels. Many adults who supplement the recommended 1000-2000 IU per day are still deficient when their blood levels are tested.

Factors that affect vitamin D status:

  1. Insufficient sun exposure: If you work 9-5 or are wary of the sun, and therefore don’t spend much time outside, or cover-up and use sunblock, you likely aren’t getting enough vitamin D from sun exposure. And if you live in Canada, it’s essentially impossible to make vitamin D during the winter, even on sunny days.
  2. Skin pigmentation: People with darker skin tones have more melanin in their skin, which can interfere with the amount of vitamin D that the skin can produce. While fifteen minutes in the sun may be enough for a fair-skinned individual, someone with a deep complexion may require as much as six times the amount of sun exposure.
  3. Age: Seniors have an increased risk of developing vitamin D deficiency for a few different reasons. As we age, we lose some of the ability to synthesize vitamin D from sunlight. Vitamin D also needs to be activated in the kidneys, which also decrease in function with age. Lastly, many seniors are housebound and therefore aren’t able to get adequate sun exposure outdoors.
  4. Kidney dysfunction: With age, the kidneys lose some of their ability to convert vitamin D into its active form.
  5. Digestive disorders/diseases: When the digestive tract is unable to absorb vitamin D, for instance, due to conditions such as Crohn’s disease, cystic fibrosis, and celiac disease.
  6. Obesity: Vitamin D is extracted from the blood by fat cells, thereby reducing its circulation throughout the body. Obese individuals typically require higher amounts of vitamin D supplements to prevent deficiency.

What are the symptoms of vitamin D deficiency?

  • Joint and muscle pain
  • Muscle weakness
  • Fatigue
  • Brain fog/Difficulty thinking clearly
  • Fatigue
  • Mood changes
  • Frequent infections or slow healing time

How can I get my vitamin D levels tested?

A simple blood test can be used to see if you have vitamin D deficiency. Your results can indicate the following:

vitamin D capsule

  • Severe Deficiency = less than 30 nmol/L
  • Deficiency = between 30 nmol/L and 75 nmol/L
  • Normal levels = between 75 nmol/L  and 100 nmol/L
  • Optimal levels = between 100-200 nmol/mL

How can I raise my vitamin D levels if I’m deficient?

  1. Get outside: practice safe sun exposure but don’t be afraid of the sun!
  2. Take a vitamin D3 supplement (dosing will be based on your blood levels)- gelcaps or drops are best for absorption.
  3. Get a series of vitamin D injections to raise your levels more quickly (as your Naturopathic Doctor if they offer these.

Resources

Sleep Hygiene Tips for Restful Sleep

What is Sleep Hygiene?

Sleep hygiene is a term that you may have heard a lot of recently. But what is it? According to the National Sleep Foundation, sleep hygiene is defined as “a variety of practices and habits that are necessary to have good nighttime sleep quality and full daytime alertness.”

Frequent sleep disturbances and daytime sleepiness are the most telling signs of poor sleep hygiene. In addition, if you’re taking too long to fall asleep, you should consider evaluating your sleep routine and revising your bedtime habits. Just a few simple changes can make the difference between a good night’s sleep and night spent tossing and turning.

Why is Sleep Hygiene Important?

Our quality of sleep is not only determined by what we do before bed, but rather by the sum of how we spend our entire day. Think of your sleep routine as starting the moment you get up in the morning.

insomnia

Why is Sleep Loss So Common? 

Let’s face it: we live in a fast-paced crazy world! Sadly, the lifestyle most of us adopt to get through our crazy days often make it hard to sleep at night.  Lack of sleep may be caused by many factors but in my experience the two most common factors are stress causing an overstimulated nervous system and poor blood sugar management.

Quantity Versus Quality:

Getting at least 7 hours of sleep every night is needed for optimal energy and overall health. However, sleep quality is equally as important as the number of hours spent in bed. Getting adequate, good quality sleep means that you should wake easily and feel rested and refreshed.

How Hormones Affect Sleep:

There also appears to gender differences when it comes to sleep, and a strong link between female sex hormones and sleep. While women report higher duration and quality of sleep than men, they also frequently report sleep issues. Women are more likely to have insomnia than men, the latter of which report higher incidences of sleep apnea or obstructed sleep. Menstrual cycles, pregnancy, and menopause can alter sleep, as well as a combination of environmental, social, and cultural influences on these biological factors, not to mention pre-existing medical conditions.

Simple Ways to Get a Better Sleep:

It’s clear that there are many benefits to getting enough good quality sleep. Here are some tips that can help to improve your sleep hygiene and establish good sleep habits:

  1. Be consistent: As best as you can, maintain the same sleep and wake patterns every day. This will help your body establish a healthy sleep-wake cycle.
  2. Limit daytime naps: You’ll sleep better at night if you eliminate naps. However, if you need to nap, limit them to 30 minutes or less, keeping in mind that napping does not make up for inadequate nighttime sleep, but can help to improve mood, alertness, and performance.
  3. Exercise at the right time: Regular exercise helps to improve sleep, as long as your workout isn’t too close to your bedtime. Aim to finish any vigorous activity 3 to 4 hours before you plan to go to sleep. On the other hand, gentle exercises before bed, such as yin or restorative yoga, can help the mind and body calm and prepare for sleep.
  4. Adequate exposure to natural light: This is particularly important for individuals who may not venture outside frequently. Exposure to sunlight during the day (especially when you first wake up), as well as darkness at night, helps to maintain a healthy sleep-wake cycle.
  5. Limit caffeine intake to before noon
  6. Choose a healthy bedtime snack: snacking before bed can be especially helpful for individuals with poor blood sugar balance. The best bedtime snacks contain tryptophan, and amino acid that helps the body make serotonin, a chemical in the brain that aids in the sleep process. My favourite go-to’s are raw pumpkin seeds (or other nuts/seeds) or a rice cake with nut butter.
  7. Power down: The soft blue glow from a cell phone, tablet, or digital clock on your bedside table may hurt your sleep. Turn off TVs, computers, and other blue-light sources an hour before you go to bed. Cover any displays you can’t shut off.
  8. Make you sleep environment pleasant: The Academy of Sleep advises that we think of our bedroom as a cave. Meaning, your room should be cool, dark, and quiet (i.e. free of distracting electronic devices). Your sheets should be clean and your bedding appropriate for the time of year, so your sleep is not disturbed because you are either too hot or too cold. If you share your bedroom, communicate your sleep needs with your partner, so you are both on the same page, sleep-wise. This will help limit partner-related sleep disturbances.
  9. Establish a relaxing bedtime routine: For example, dim the light 2 to 3 hours before bedtime. At least an hour before bed, (if hungry) eat tryptophan-rich snack, turn off all electronics, enjoy a cup of chamomile tea, or take a bath with essential oils like lavender. Half an hour before bed, do a little light yoga and/or mediation, or read. You can also journal about anything that’s on your mind. Fifteen minutes before bed, make sure your room is quiet, cool, and dark, and your bedding is fresh and appropriate for the weather. At bedtime, slip under the covers, and practice some deep breathing techniques, or read (no electronics!) until you’re tired enough to drift off.
  10. Make your room 100% dark: make your room dark enough that you can’t see your hand in front of your face when you go to bed. Blackout curtains are a great investment or simply wear an eye mask. Note: If you don’t fall asleep in about 30 minutes, try repeating some of these steps, until you feel tired enough to drift off. There’s no point in suffering and becoming more frustrated.

Resources:

 

5 Essential Thyroid Tests for Women

If you are experiencing some of the following symptoms, it may be worth having your thyroid tested to rule out thyroid hormone imbalances:

  • Very slow or very fast heart rate
  • Weight gain or difficulty losing weight (or rapid weight loss)
  • Change in menstrual cycles (irregular periods, heavy periods)
  • Always feeling very cold or overly hot (or going from one extreme to the next)
  • Fatigue
  • Hair loss
  • Elevated LDL cholesterol level
  • Depression

5 Essential Thyroid Tests to ask for:

  1. TSH (thyroid stimulating hormone)
  2. Free T4
  3. Free T3
  4. TPO-antibodies & TG-antibodies
  5. Reverse T3

Understanding Your Test Results

1. TSH is short for thyroid-stimulating hormone, a hormone made by the pituitary gland (located in the brain) which tells the thyroid what to do. Think of it as the knock on the door. If the thyroid is not doing it’s job, the pituitary will knock more loudly (elevated TSH) whereas if the thyroid is working optimally, the knock will be very light (lower TSH). As you can see, TSH is not made in the thyroid meaning it’s an indirect way of looking at thyroid function.

High levels of TSH may indicate hypothyroidism (i.e. underactive thyroid), a pituitary gland tumor, or inadequate thyroid hormone medication in the treatment of a preexisting condition. Low levels of TSH may indicate hyperthyroidism (i.e. overactive thyroid), damage to the pituitary gland, too much thyroid medication in the treatment of a preexisting condition, or pregnancy in the first trimester.

  • Normal Range: 0.4-5 mIU/L
  • Optimal Range: 0.4 -2.5 mIU/L
  • Hypothyroidism = TSH > 5 mIU/L
  • Hyperthyroidism = TSH < 0.4 mIU/L

2. Free T4: T4 is the main hormone produced by the thyroid so it’s the most direct way at looking at actual thyroid gland function. Keep in mind that T4 is a very weak, mostly inactive hormone that’s main purpose is to be converted into T3 (see below).

  • Normal Range: 9-22 pm/L
  • Optimal Range: 14-18 pm/L
  • Hypothyroidism = < 9 pm/L
  • Hyperthyroidism =  > 20 pm/L

3. Free T3: is made from T4 throughout the body but mostly in the liver. T3 is the most active form of thyroid hormone and is responsible for giving us energy, revving up our metabolism, keeping us warm and with hair on our head. It’s vital to look at T3 hormone levels in order to gauge if there is thyroid dysfunction because you can have normal TSH and T4 levels but if you aren’t converting well to T3 you can still have symptoms of thyroid imbalance.

  • Normal Range: 3.4-5.9 mIU/L
  • Optimal Range: 4.5-5.5 mIU/L
  • Hypothyroidism =  <3.4
  • Hyperthyroidism =  > 6

4. Thyroid Antibodies (TPO and TG): Thyroid peroxidase (TPO), an enzyme found in the thyroid gland, plays a key role in the production of thyroid hormones. A TPO test detects antibodies against TPO in the blood, the presence of which suggests that the cause of thyroid disease is an autoimmune disorder (e.g. Hashimoto’s or Grave’s disease).

  • Normal Range: < 35 kIU/L
  • Auto-immune disease (e.g. Hashimoto’s or Graves’s) > 35 kIU/L

5. Reverse T3: is essentially a “dud” hormone that is made when the body is under stress. A small percentage of our T4 hormone is always converted to reverse T3 in order to prevent the body from being overstimulated by T3. However, in certain conditions, especially with higher stress and cortisol hormone levels, the body can convert too much T4 into reverse T3 which essentially blocks other thyroid hormones from doing their job.

  • Normal Range = < 9-24 ng/dL
  • Optimal Range = less than 18 ng/dL

These tests are all done through a simple blood test which your MD can request. Naturopathic Doctors are also able to run these tests which will cost approximately $100.

Is Estrogen Dominance causing your weight gain, heavy periods, and breast tenderness?

digestive-upsetWhat is estrogen dominance?

Estrogen is one of the primary female sex hormones. In women, estrogen helps initiate sexual development, regulates menstruation, and effects the entire reproductive system. Normally, estrogen is in delicate balance with another primary sex hormone, progesterone. This balance is necessary for both to function efficiently, and can be susceptible to disruption if levels in either shift.

There are two ways that estrogen dominance can present itself in the body. When the body has either too much estrogen from overproduction, or a lack of progesterone, it enters a state referred to as “estrogen dominance.” That is, too much estrogen relative to progesterone.

The body produces three main types of estrogen: estrone, estradiol, and estriol. Many women’s ailments, including breast cancer, uterine fibroids and cancer, ovarian cysts and cancer, endometriosis, polycystic ovary syndrome, and hypothyroidism are caused or promoted by excesses of estradiol, estrone, environmental estrogens, and synthetic estrogens.

Estrogen in our bodies comes from five possible sources:

  • FROM INSIDE THE BODY: estrogen is made in the ovaries, placenta, adrenal glands, and fat cells.
  • FROM OUTSIDE THE BODY:
    • Estrogen-like foods and herbs (e.g. soy, legumes, pumpkin seeds, licorice root, etc.)
    • Animal products that has been raised using hormones (e.g. meat, poultry, fish, dairy.)
    • Environmental chemicals or xenoestrogens (e.g. pesticides, plastics, parabens, cleaning products, personal care products, etc.)
    • Synthetic estrogens (e.g. birth control, fertility drugs, hormone replacement therapy.)

What Causes Estrogen Dominance?

During the course of a normal menstrual cycle, estrogen is the dominant hormone for the first two weeks leading up to ovulation. Estrogen is balanced by progesterone during the last two weeks. However, as a woman approaches perimenopause and begins to experience anovulatory cycles (i.e. cycles where no ovulation occurs), estrogen can often go unopposed, thus causing symptoms. Skipping ovulation, however, is only one potential factor in estrogen dominance. Other causes may include:

  • Being overweight (i.e. body fat greater than 28%) since fat cells produce estrogen
  • Having a burdened liver, which leads to estrogen not being broken down and eliminated from the body efficiently. The result is estrogen recirculating and accumulating.
  • Being overstressed. This results in excess amounts of cortisol, insulin, and norepinephrine, which can lead to adrenal exhaustion and adversely affect your overall hormonal balance.
  • A low-fibre diet containing too many refined carbohydrates, and not enough nutrients and high quality fats. Fibre helps eliminate estrogen through bowel movements.
  • Environmental exposure to estrogen-like compounds such as phthalates and BPA.

Estrogen dominance has also been linked to allergies, autoimmune disorders, breast cancer, uterine cancer, infertility, ovarian cysts, endometriosis, polycystic ovary syndrome, and increased blood clotting, and is also associated with acceleration of the aging process.

Signs and Symptoms of Estrogen Dominance:

Estrogen dominance can result in serious long-term complications, as well as other signs and symptoms, such as:

  • Weight gain (especially in the hips and thighs)
  • Irregular/abnormal menstruation (heavy bleeding, large clots)
  • Insomnia (especially waking up in the middle of the night)
  • Thyroid dysfunction
  • Fibrocystic breasts, breast swelling and tenderness
  • Low libido
  • Sluggish metabolism
  • Foggy thinking, memory loss
  • Acne
  • Mood swings
  • Menstrual cramps
  • Headaches

Ways to Decrease Estrogen Dominance:

  • Follow a hormone-balancing diet (i.e. eat lots of fresh fruits and vegetables, enough protein, and healthy fats.)
  • Increase your fibre intake to help the excretion of estrogen, which can also prevent its reabsorption through the bowel
  • Consume cruciferous veggies (such as cauliflower, cabbage, broccoli, kale, Brussel sprouts) daily to help with estrogen metabolism and clearance
  • Choose organic meat and dairy to reduce your exposure to environmental hormones used in farming
  • Reduce excess body fat and exercise regularly to promote detoxification and circulation
  • Manage daily stress
  • Reduce your exposure to hormones, pesticides, and antibiotics in your environment and diet
  • Avoid synthetic estrogens (e.g. birth control pills, synthetic hormone replacement therapy)
  • Switch your personal care products to those that are free of phthalates, fragrances, parabens and other hormone disrupting chemicals
  • Get rid of plastic water bottles and food storage containers. Replace them with ceraminc, glass or stainless steel.

Resources:

Common Causes of Hair Loss

hair lossBackground: Hair’s Natural Growth Cycle

Hair grows in three different cycles: anagen, catagen, and telogen. About 90% of the hair on the head is in the anagen, or growth phase, which lasts anywhere from 2 to 8 years. The catagen, or transition phase, typically lasts 2 to 3 weeks, during which the hair follicle shrinks. During the telogen cycle, which lasts around 2 to 4 months, the hair rests.

Most people normally shed 50 to 100 hairs a day. This usually doesn’t cause noticeable thinning of scalp hair because new hair is growing in at the same time. Hair loss occurs when this cycle of hair growth and shedding is disrupted or when the hair follicle is destroyed and replaced with scar tissue.

The exact cause of hair loss may not be fully understood, but it is usually related to one or more of the following factors:

  • Genetics (e.g. family history)
  • Hormonal changes or imbalances (e.g. pregnancy, menopause, birth control pills)
  • Medical conditions
  • Medications
  • Stress (including after surgery)
  • Improper nutrition (vitamin and/or mineral deficiency)

Although hair loss may seem like a more prominent problem in men, women are nearly as likely to lose or have thinning hair.

Common Causes of Hair Loss in Women

1. High Cortisol:

Hair loss is often caused by an imbalance in hormone levels. One of the hormones closely connected with hair loss is cortisol.

Cortisol is a steroid hormone that is normally released in response to events and circumstances such as waking up in the morning, exercising, and acute stress. In its normal function, cortisol regulates a wide range of processes throughout the body including metabolism and immune response. It also has an important role in helping the body respond to stress (i.e. the body’s fight-or-flight response).

However, at sustained high levels, cortisol can be damaging over time. Extended stress leads to extended periods of high cortisol levels. While the adrenal glands are busy making extra cortisol, they make less of the hormones that support healthy hair growth.

2. Low Protein Intake:

Hair loss may occasionally be caused by lack of protein in the diet. When this happens, the body will help save protein by shifting growing hairs into the resting phase. Increased hair shedding can occur two to three months later.

3Elevated Male Hormones:

  • Testosterone: High levels of testosterone has been commonly associated with hair loss. Although women have much lower levels of testosterone than men do, there is enough to potentially cause hair loss, particularly during periods of hormonal change.  However, researchers now believe that it is not only amount of circulating testosterone that leads to hair loss, but more significantly the level of dihydrotestosterone (DHT) binding to receptors in scalp follicles.
  • Dihydrotestosterone (DHT): Testosterone converts to DHT with the aid of the enzyme 5-alpha reductase, which is held in a hair follicle’s oil glands. In high levels, DHT shrinks hair follicles, decreasing hair’s natural growth cycle and ability to replace itself.

4. Thyroid Issues:

Hair loss may be a sign that thyroid hormones are out of balance. Both hypothyroidism and hyperthyroidism can cause hair to shed. Because hair growth depends on the proper functioning of the thyroid gland, abnormal levels of thyroid hormones can result in hair changes if left untreated. When the thyroid gland is overactive (hyperthyroidism), the hair on your head can become fine, with thinning hair all over the scalp. When the thyroid gland is underactive (hypothyroidism), there can be hair loss, not just on the scalp, but also anywhere on the body. In most cases, the hair will grow back once the thyroid disorder is treated.

5. Low Progesterone:

From the time menses begins until menopause, levels of estrogen and progesterone in women ebb and flow to promote reproduction. At about age 35 to 40, women reach the time of perimenopause. This is when their levels of progesterone and estrogen begin to reduce. Progesterone helps to counterbalance the negative effects of estrogen. When there is not enough progesterone to counterbalance estrogen, one may begin to have symptoms of estrogen dominance, such as hair loss.

6. Iron Deficiency:

Iron deficiency hair loss is caused when the body lacks enough iron to produce hemoglobin in the blood. Hemoglobin carries oxygen for the growth and repair of all body cells including the cells that make up hair follicles.

Temporary hair loss such as iron deficiency hair loss is called telogen effluvium. Telogen effluvium is an abnormality of the hair growth cycle that causes hair that would normally be in the anagen (growth) phase of the hair growth cycle to be prematurely pushed into the telogen (rest) phase, causing hair to shed. Because hair is non-essential, hair growth is one of the first processes to be affected when iron or other nutrient deficiencies occur.

7. Zinc Deficiency:

Zinc is a trace mineral that is needed for many important bodily functions in the body such as building healthy cells, regulating hormones, and aiding in the absorption of other nutrients.

Zinc is available through foods such as beef, pork, shellfish, peanuts, and legumes. Zinc deficiency (or hypozincemia) is a nutrient deficiency precipitated by malnutrition or malabsorption of the element. Deficiency may cause weak, brittle nails, diarrhea, slow healing, and hair loss.

Resources:

  • Mayo Clinic: http://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/hair-loss/basics/definition/con-20027666
  • http://www.mayoclinic.org/drugs-supplements/zinc/background/hrb-20060638
  • You & Your Hormones: http://www.yourhormones.info/Hormones/Cortisol.aspx
  • Today’s Dietician: http://www.todaysdietitian.com/newarchives/111609p38.shtml
  • WebMD: http://www.webmd.com/skin-problems-and-treatments/hair-loss/hair-loss-causes-women

Natural Medicine for Public Servants

Are you a public servant?

Did you know that your health insurance plan covers Naturopathic Medicine?

Naturopathic Doctors are experts in natural and complementary medicine. We offer natural solutions to common health concerns such as fatigue, insomnia, hypothyroid, digestive issues like IBS, and many more!  By using safe and effective natural therapies such as nutrition, nutritional supplements (vitamins, minerals, herbal medicines), acupuncture, and lifestyle counselling, Naturopathic Doctors help you feel better and optimize your health.  

To learn more about how Naturopathic Medicine can help you
book your FREE 15-minute  Meet & Greet consultation with Dr. Sarah Vadeboncoeur

I tested negative for Celiac. Can I still be sensitive to gluten?

In short, YES! There are 3 major categories of wheat or gluten-related diseases: celiac disease, wheat allergy, and gluten sensitivity. It can be very difficult to distinguish between the three based on symptoms alone. For this reason, food allergy/sensitivity testing can be very helpful in identifying what type of food allergies you may have.

Celiac disease

  • Affects approximately 1 in 132 individuals
  • Confirmed by a 3-part test: antibodies to gluten in the blood, atrophy of the small intestine (biopsy), and improvement with a gluten-free diet

Wheat allergy

  • Confirmed by the presence of IgE antibodies to wheat (blood test)
  • Food “allergy” symptoms tend to occur within 24 hours of eating the allergenic food (peanut allergies, for example, involve IgE antibodies)
  • Can present like celiac disease with symptoms including: asthma, eczema and digestive issues

Gluten sensitivity

  • Estimated to be 6 times more common than celiac disease!
  • Confirmed by presence of IgG and/or IgA antibodies to gluten (blood test)
  • Gluten sensitivity can be difficult to identify through food journaling because the symptoms resulting from the sensitivity can occur 24-72 hours after eating gluten and do not always affect the digestive system (see below)

The most common symptoms that can be caused by gluten sensitivity are (and frequency):

  • Abdominal pain (68%)
  • Eczema or skin rash (40%)
  • Headaches (35%)
  • Foggy mind (34%)
  • Fatigue (33%)
  • Diarrhea (33%)
  • Depression (22%)
  • Anemia (20%)
  • Numbness in arms, finger or legs (20%)
  • Joint pain (11%)

If you suffer from one of more of these conditions, consider eliminating gluten from your diet for a minimum of 3 weeks to see if you improve. Food allergy testing can also help identify food allergies and sensitivities to a variety of foods.

Contact me to find out if food allergy and sensitivity testing is right for you!

Source: Doherty, C. (2012). Defining Gluten Sensitivity. NDNR. www.ndnr.com

5 Reasons Every Woman Should See a Naturopathic Doctor

Wondering why you would go see a Naturopathic Doctor?

Check out this article which outlines 5 reasons to see an ND. The benefits you can enjoy include:

  • More energy
  • Better sleep
  • Improved digestion
  • Clear, glowing skin
  • PMS relief & hormone balance

Have a specific condition that you want help with? Book your FREE 15-minute consultation with me to learn how Naturopathic Medicine can help you achieve optimal health.

Yours in health,

Sarah