3 Natural Treatment Options for Vaginal Dryness

Vaginal dryness is a common complaint during peri-menopause and menopause but it can happen at any age.  As estrogen levels start to drop, vaginal moisture dries up which can result in vaginal atrophy, painful intercourse and an increased risk for vaginal infections. The hormonal changes following childbirth can also cause vaginal dryness and painful intercourse.

The good news is there are a variety of natural treatment options for vaginal dryness.

1. Hydrate your vagina from the inside out

Keeping your body hydrated and moist is crucial to combat vaginal dryness. Drink at least 2L of water each and every day. Increase your intake of healthy oils including cold-pressed olive oil, coconut oil, avocado oil, flax oil etc. Aim for at least 1 tsp with every meal. If you’re still experiencing vaginal dryness, consider adding a Sea Buckthorne supplement. Sea Buckthorne is an omega-7 fatty acid which specifically helps relieve vaginal dryness (and it makes your skin look great as an added bonus). I love NFH’s Sea Buckthorne SAP which is available at Docere Naturopathic Clinic + IV Lounge and through our online dispensary.

2. Try Dr. Sarah’s compounded vaginal cream

This non-hormonal option is great for younger women with vaginal dryness or women who can’t or prefer not to use hormones. It combines hyaluronic acid (which helps to attract and retain moisture) and vitamins A and E to help hydrate and heal the tissues. Apply it every night for 2 weeks then 2 times per week or as needed. Just ask for a prescription at your next appointment! Another option is the over-the-counter product Cala-Gel by St. Francis Herb Farm.

3. Ask about bio-identical estrogen cream

Estriol is the weakest of our 3 naturally made forms of estrogen. It can be applied as a cream vaginally which is extremely safe and poses minimal risk. Estriol is so safe that it’s actually being used in women who have a history of breast cancer. Ask Dr. Sarah if this product may be right for you. It’s also applied nightly for 2 weeks, then 2 times a week for 2 weeks then as needed.

Vitamin D Deficiency: the missing key to your optimal health?

Vitamin D is best known for its role in forming strong, healthy bones, however, it also plays a critical role in the following areas:

  • Immune system
  • Hormone balance
  • Muscle function
  • Cardiovascular function
  • Respiratory function
  • Brain development
  • Anti-cancer effects

What are the best ways to get vitamin D?

Commonly known as “the sunshine vitamin,” the skin is able to make vitamin D when it is exposed to sunlight. There are also small amounts of vitamin D in foods such as fortified milk, and yogurt, cheese, eggs, cod liver oil, beef liver, and fatty fish such as salmon, trout, and tuna. However, it is very difficult to meet you requirements through diet alone.

How much vitamin D do I need?

The Recommended Dietary Allowance (RDA) for adults is 600 international units (IU) for adults, and 800 IU for seniors over the age of 70. These are the bare minimum amounts you need to prevent rickets but they are FAR from enough for most adults to optimize vitamin D levels to get all of its benefits (including anti-cancer effects).

According to the Vitamin D Council (and based on my clinical experience), most adults require 4000 IU or more during the winter months depending on their blood levels. Many adults who supplement the recommended 1000-2000 IU per day are still deficient when their blood levels are tested.

Factors that affect vitamin D status:

  1. Insufficient sun exposure: If you work 9-5 or are wary of the sun, and therefore don’t spend much time outside, or cover-up and use sunblock, you likely aren’t getting enough vitamin D from sun exposure. And if you live in Canada, it’s essentially impossible to make vitamin D during the winter, even on sunny days.
  2. Skin pigmentation: People with darker skin tones have more melanin in their skin, which can interfere with the amount of vitamin D that the skin can produce. While fifteen minutes in the sun may be enough for a fair-skinned individual, someone with a deep complexion may require as much as six times the amount of sun exposure.
  3. Age: Seniors have an increased risk of developing vitamin D deficiency for a few different reasons. As we age, we lose some of the ability to synthesize vitamin D from sunlight. Vitamin D also needs to be activated in the kidneys, which also decrease in function with age. Lastly, many seniors are housebound and therefore aren’t able to get adequate sun exposure outdoors.
  4. Kidney dysfunction: With age, the kidneys lose some of their ability to convert vitamin D into its active form.
  5. Digestive disorders/diseases: When the digestive tract is unable to absorb vitamin D, for instance, due to conditions such as Crohn’s disease, cystic fibrosis, and celiac disease.
  6. Obesity: Vitamin D is extracted from the blood by fat cells, thereby reducing its circulation throughout the body. Obese individuals typically require higher amounts of vitamin D supplements to prevent deficiency.

What are the symptoms of vitamin D deficiency?

  • Joint and muscle pain
  • Muscle weakness
  • Fatigue
  • Brain fog/Difficulty thinking clearly
  • Fatigue
  • Mood changes
  • Frequent infections or slow healing time

How can I get my vitamin D levels tested?

A simple blood test can be used to see if you have vitamin D deficiency. Your results can indicate the following:

vitamin D capsule

  • Severe Deficiency = less than 30 nmol/L
  • Deficiency = between 30 nmol/L and 75 nmol/L
  • Normal levels = between 75 nmol/L  and 100 nmol/L
  • Optimal levels = between 100-200 nmol/mL

How can I raise my vitamin D levels if I’m deficient?

  1. Get outside: practice safe sun exposure but don’t be afraid of the sun!
  2. Take a vitamin D3 supplement (dosing will be based on your blood levels)- gelcaps or drops are best for absorption.
  3. Get a series of vitamin D injections to raise your levels more quickly (as your Naturopathic Doctor if they offer these.

Resources

Getting to Know Your Thyroid

Written by: Sarah Vadeboncoeur & Anita Kushwaha

What is your thyroid?

Your thyroid is a small, butterfly-shaped gland situated at the base of the front of your neck, just below your Adam’s apple.

thyroidgland

What does your thyroid do?

The thyroid gland uses iodine from the foods you eat to make two main hormones:

  • Triiodothyronine (T3)
  • Thyroxine (T4)

These hormones produced by the thyroid gland — T3 and T4 — have a great impact on your health, affecting all aspects of your metabolism.

The thyroid’s hormones regulate vital body functions. For instance, they maintain the rate at which your body uses fats and carbohydrates, help control your body temperature, influence your heart rate, and help regulate the production of proteins.

If your thyroid isn’t functioning optimally, it may affect:

  • Heart rate
  • Nervous system
  • Body weight and metabolism
  • Muscle strength
  • Menstrual cycles
  • Body temperature
  • Cholesterol levels

What is hypothyroidism?

Hypothyroidism (i.e. underactive thyroid) is a condition in which your thyroid gland doesn’t produce enough of the above mentioned hormones. When this occurs, bodily functions slow down.

Hypothyroidism may either be genetic or develop in the course of life. There can be many different causes for an underactive thyroid. For example, one reason might be a lack of iodine. Getting enough iodine through your diet is therefore important for normal thyroid function. Similarly, a condition called Hashimoto’s thyroiditis –  an auto-immune condition that causes chronic inflammation of the thyroid – can also lead to underactivity.

What are the symptoms of hypothyroidism?

Hypothyroidism symptoms may include:

  • Fatigue, tiredness
  • Slowed heart rate and metabolism
  • Weight gain
  • Muscle weakness, aches, tenderness and stiffness
  • Constipation, digestive upset
  • Elevated blood cholesterol level
  • Heavy or irregular menstruation
  • Cold sensitivity
  • Hair loss or dry/brittle hair
  • Dry skin
  • Joint pain, stiffness or swelling
  • Depression
  • Impaired memory and concentration
  • Loss of sexual desire

Concerned about your thyroid function? Contact Dr. Sarah to inquire about getting your thyroid levels tested.

 References:

  1. Mayo Clinic: http://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/hypothyroidism/home/ovc-20155291
  2. PubMed Health: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmedhealth/PMH0072572/
  3. EndocrineWeb: https://www.endocrineweb.com/conditions/thyroid/hypothyroidism-too-little-thyroid-hormone